Archive for the ‘March 2007’ Category

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2007 March Indie Film Fest

March 1, 2007

Showtimes are at 4:00pm and 7:30pm each day at Cherrydale Cinemas in Greenville, SC.Cherrydale Cinemas
3221 North Pleasantburg Drive
Greenville, SC 29609
(864) 370-9166
Map & Directions

BUY TICKETS HERE

March 6-8: LITTLE CHILDREN
March 6-8
Synopsis: Actor-turned-director Todd Field follows up his Oscar-nominated drama, IN THE BEDROOM, with this ambitious adaptation of Tom Perrotta’s celebrated novel. Set in the imploding minefields of modern suburbia, LITTLE CHILDREN follows several inhabitants of a small American town as they fumble their way through adulthood. Numb-to-life housewife and mother Sarah Pierce (Kate Winslet) finds an outlet for her yearning in gorgeous househusband Brad Adamson (Patrick Wilson), who is crippled with insecurity over the fact that his perfect wife, Kathy (Jennifer Connelly), is the family breadwinner. When Sarah and Brad meet at the local playground one afternoon, a passionate affair is sparked. In a further attempt to reclaim his youthful fire, Brad joins a night football league with Larry Hedges (Noah Emmerich), a former cop who has begun to harass a convicted sex offender, Ronnie J. McGorvey (Jackie Earle Haley). These troubled lives eventually collide, causing each individual to take full responsibility for their not-so-responsible actions. Adapted for the screen by Field and Perrotta and artfully photographed by Antonio Calvache, LITTLE CHILDREN is a bitingly funny, and nakedly honest, critique of middle class dysfunction.

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Official Site
More info at The Internet Movie Database
Reviews at Rotten Tomatoes

March 13-15: VENUS
March 13-15
Synopsis: Screen legend Peter O’Toole stars in this moving story of an elderly actor and his somewhat questionable relationship with a teenage girl. Maurice (O’Toole) and his friend Ian (Leslie Phillips) are two classy curmudgeons whiling away their hours in coffee shops and at the theater, but their routine is thrown for a loop when Ian’s niece’s daughter Jessie (Jodie Whittaker) is sent from the country to act as his nurse. Jessie shows up on the scene sullen and pouty, immediately drinking all the liquor in the house and slouching her way from room to room. But Maurice befriends her, taking her to museums and getting her a gig as an art model, and along the way he openly expresses the lust she has awakened in him. Jessie’s brash rejections of his affections are at first as amusing as they are awkward. When she starts to allow him small pleasures–like kissing her bare shoulders or caressing her hands–the film enters into some uncomfortable, complicated territory, but it is deftly navigated by Hanif Kureishi’s sharp screenplay, and O’Toole’s heartbreaking performance. Far from just a tale of a May-December romance, VENUS is a very raw look at growing old, and the aches and pains, both emotional and physical, that accompany a man near the end of his life. It is an honest, moving portrait of human desire, and how it can both beat us down and lift us up–no matter the age.

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Official Site
More info at The Internet Movie Database
Reviews at Rotten Tomatoes

March 20-22: THIS FILM IS NOT YET RATED
March 20-22
Synopsis: Passionate cinephiles can be found casting quizzical glances at the erratic and often conflicting decisions made by the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) as they slap ratings onto movies. So in an attempt to make sense of their working methods–which, until now, have remained shrouded in mystery–one of those cinephiles, Kirby Dick (TWIST OF FAITH), has made this full-length motion picture about the inner workings of the MPAA. Dick begins by examining the MPAA’s set-up as an anonymous group that is exclusively funded by the major Hollywood studios. Fundamentally established to prevent children’s eyes from seeing anything society would consider unsuitable, the MPAA has blossomed into a powerful force, with the difference between an R and an NC-17 rating possibly leading to millions of dollars forfeited at the box office. Actors and directors such as John Waters, Maria Bello, Mary Harron, and Kevin Smith offer their forthright opinions on these decisions, and Dick highlights many of the clips that have fallen foul of the censors. The director also compares and contrasts similar scenes from indie pictures and films produced by major studios, with the latter seemingly allowed far more leniency when it comes to avoiding the dreaded NC-17. In a wonderful twist that adds a strong narrative structure to the film, Dick hires a private detective to hunt down the MPAA’s members, thereby lifting the curtain on who these shadowy figures actually are. But the real cherry on the top of Dick’s movie is his submission of THIS FILM HAS NOT YET BEEN RATED to the MPAA, which helps highlight the appeals process, and reveals the involvement of the Catholic Church and major cinema chains across the country. Entertaining and informative, Dick’s movie is everything a documentary should be. Revelations come thick and fast throughout, and the director skillfully creates a palpable feeling of injustice that will leave many viewers feeling the MPAA is in urgent need of a drastic overhaul.

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Official Site
More info at The Internet Movie Database
Reviews at Rotten Tomatoes

March 27-29: SHERRYBABY
March 27-29
Synopsis: Maggie Gyllenhaal is mesmerizing as a recovering addict in writer-director Laurie Collyer’s feature-length fiction-film debut, SHERRYBABY. Gyllenhaal stars as Sherry Swanson, a troubled woman who has just been released from prison, where she spent three years for robbery to support her heroin addiction. Determined to regain control of her life, she moves into a halfway house and starts looking for a job, being carefully watched by her tough parole officer (Giancarlo Esposito). At an AA meeting, she is drawn to Dean Walker (Danny Trejo), a gritty older man who befriends her–but his ties to her dangerous past life threaten to pull her back in. Sherry’s main desire is to reestablish a relationship with her young daughter, Alexis (Ryan Simpkins), who is being raised by Sherry’s brother, Bobby (Brad William Henke), and his wife, Lynnette (Bridget Barkan)–but Lynnette doesn’t trust Sherry, wanting to keep Alexis for her own. As Sherry struggles to get back on track, she plays by her own rules, with drugs and a return to prison waiting just around the corner. Gyllenhaal gives a raw, bare, powerful performance as the embattled and desperate Sherry, who will do almost anything to regain her daughter’s love. Loosely based on the story of one of Collyer’s closest childhood friends, SHERRYBABY, which got its start in the Sundance Filmmaker’s Lab, is an emotional rollercoaster of a movie, with realistic characters, an excellent cast, and plenty of surprising turns.

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Official Site
More info at The Internet Movie Database
Reviews at Rotten Tomatoes